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Teddington Lock
Conservation Area Appraisal
Conservation area no.27

  • Designated: 15 March 1977
  • Extended: 7 September 1982, 22 February 2005, and 20 February 2019
Figure 1 View of Lock scene

Figure 1 View of Lock scene

Contents

1. Introduction

1.1 Purpose of this document

The principal aims of conservation area appraisals are to:

  • Describe the historic and architectural character and appearance of the area which will assist applicants in making successful planning applications and decision makers in assessing planning applications.
  • Raise public interest and awareness of the special character of their area
  • Identify the positive features which should be conserved, as well as negative features which indicate scope for future enhancements.

This document has been produced using the guidance set out by Historic England in the 2019 publication titled Understanding Place: Conservation Area Designation, Appraisal and Management, Historic England Advice Note 1 (Second Edition). This document will be a material consideration when assessing planning applications.

1.2 What is a conservation area?

The statutory definition of a conservation area is an ‘area of special architectural or historic interest, the character or appearance of which it is desirable to preserve or enhance’.

The power to designate conservation areas is given to local authorities through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservations Areas) Act, 1990 (Sections 69 to 78).

Once designated, proposals within a conservation area become subject to local conservation policies set out in our Local Plan, the London Plan,  and national policies of the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF).

Our overarching duty which is set out in the Act is to preserve and/or enhance the historic or architectural character or appearance of the conservation area.

1.3 Buildings of Townscape Merit

Buildings of Townscape Merit (BTMs) are buildings, groups of buildings or structures of historic or architectural interest, which are locally listed due to their considerable local importance. The policy, as outlined in our Local Plan, sets out a presumption against the demolition of BTMs unless structural evidence has been submitted by the applicant, and independently verified at the cost of the applicant. Locally specific guidance on design and character is set out in the Council’s Buildings of Townscape Merit Supplementary Planning Document (2015), which applicants are expected to follow for any alterations and extensions to existing BTMs, or for any replacement structures.

1.4 What is an Article 4 Direction?

An Article 4 Direction is made by the local planning authority. It restricts the scope of permitted development rights either in relation to a particular area or site, or a particular type of

development anywhere in the authority's area. We have powers under Article 4 of the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 2015 to remove permitted development rights.

Article 4 Directions are used to remove national permitted development rights only in certain limited situations where it is necessary to protect local amenity or the well being of an area. An Article 4 Direction does not prevent the development to which it applies, but instead requires that planning permission is first obtained from us for that development.

For further information about Article 4 Directions, to check if any permitted developments rights in relation to a particular area/site or type of development apply in your area, visit Article 4 Directions.

1.5 What is a Conservation Area Appraisal?

A conservation area appraisal aims to describe the special historic and architectural character of an area. A conservation area’s character is defined by a combination of elements such as architecture, uses, materials and detailing as well as the relationship between buildings and their settings including landscape.

Many other elements contribute to character and appearance such as the placement of buildings within their plots; views and vistas; the relationship between the street and the buildings and the presence of trees and green space.

The Conservation Area Appraisal is an evidence base rather than a planning policy document. This means that it is the main document for recording what is of principal importance in terms of character and appearance of each conservation area.

However, the relevant policies are contained within the borough's Local Plan.

Teddington Lock Conservation Area map

Teddington Lock Conservation Area map

View an interactive map of the conservation area

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2. Statement of Significance

Summary of special architectural, historic interest of conservation area.

A comparatively small yet diverse conservation area, Teddington Lock includes a wide variety of buildings, structures and landscapes.

The conservation area can be divided into two distinct areas, although the whole conservation area is unified by its relationship to the river.

The western section of the conservation area, on the Teddington side of the river, includes a section of the High Street with shops and restaurants.

It also includes various residential streets such as Twickenham Road, Manor Road and Kingston Road.

Figure 2 Teddington Lock footbridge

Figure 2 Teddington Lock footbridge

The area features two public houses, two churches, lock houses, toll houses, boat houses, and two Grade II listed bridges.

The eastern Surrey side, on the Ham bank, has a much more rural character with just two buildings. Accessible only by foot, across the bridges from Teddington or from Ham, this bank has retained its distinct pastoral quality.

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3. Location and Setting

Teddington Lock Conservation Area is primarily a riverside conservation area but also incorporates part of the historic village core of Teddington, which lies midway between Twickenham and Hampton.

The area spans both sides of the Thames with the majority of development on the Middlesex bank, the Surrey bank retaining its rural, natural character. It adjoins High Street Teddington (37) Conservation Area to the West.

Location OS Sheets: 1671

Figure 3 Map showing Teddington in wider context

Figure 3 Map showing Teddington in wider context

Figure 4 Focused map of Teddington

Figure 4 Focused map of Teddington

This conservation area generally runs north – south along the river Thames and Manor Road into Kingston Road. Intersecting this road axis is Ferry Road and the High Street.

Figure 5 Aerial map of Teddington showing wider context

Figure 5 Aerial map of Teddington showing wider context

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4. Historical Development

The evolution of the historical development of the area, including archaeology and plot morphology, that contribute to its special character.

The riverside village of Teddington dates from at least the Anglo-Saxon period, with its associated name ‘Tudas Farm’. The Medieval period witnessed the first significant development of Teddington, seeing it expand westwards from the riverside. Previously the property of Westminster Abbey, Teddington became part of Henry Vlll's hunting estate in the 16th century. The land returned to use as an independent manor in the years following Henry’s reign and was long dependant on agriculture as its economic base.

During the 17th and 18th centuries the appealing riverside setting of this area and the nearby Royal parkland attracted wealthy residents. As a result, many large houses were built such as Manor House, Udney House and Teddington Place (later named Udney Hall). Sadly, none of these houses survive.

However, a row of listed 18th century cottages, including Peg Woffington’s Cottage still survive, along with another listed 18th century detached house on the High Street.

The arrival of the railway in 1863, which cut through the village pond, resulted in Teddington becoming a viable commuter area for London. This resulted in intensified development, with many older buildings being remodelled or replaced with new housing and shopping parades.

The original St Mary’s Parish Church dates from the 16th century but was largely rebuilt in the 18th century. Following the arrival of the railway and a subsequent increase in population, it was deemed necessary to construct a larger church.

The late 19th century former church of St. Alban, currently the Landmark Arts Centre, was built in the French gothic style and designed by William S Nevin, a pupil of George Gilbert Scott. It stands opposite the smaller original parish church of St Mary. The church was built in 1889 and consecrated in 1896 but was never finished, with its 200ft tower remaining unbuilt and the nave being shorter than intended.

Sadly, the anticipated large congregation did not materialise. In 1967 the congregation reverted to the much smaller St Mary’s across the road, leaving St Alban's unused from the 1970s onwards. It became derelict and badly vandalised and was deconsecrated in 1977. It was eventually converted to community use, with the land to the rear on Langham Road being used to build housing.

Teddington Lock and weir were constructed in1811 to control the river. The lock was originally made of timber but rebuilt in stone in 1857 in its current position.

The two footbridges, the western suspension bridge and eastern iron girder bridge were constructed in 1888 and replaced a former ferry. They are both now Grade II listed.

Teddington has long been associated with boat building, since at least 1848 when James Arthur Messenger opened his boatyard. There were also several wharfs along the Middlesex bank at the time.

In terms of Teddington’s industrial history, there were linen and wax bleaching works in the fields between the river and Broom Road, but these were moved to a factory in Waldegrave Road in 1800.

The late 20th Century and early 21st century saw significant residential riverside redevelopment, including a number of larger scale apartment blocks north along the Thames. This included the demolition of Teddington Studios and the redevelopment of the site to residential use.

Figure 6 1860s

Figure 6 1860s

Figure 7 1890s

Figure 7 1890s

Figure 8 1910s

Figure 8 1910s

Figure 9 1930s

Figure 9 1930s

Figure 10 1950s

Figure 10 1950s

Figure 11 Architectural drawing of 7 Twickenham Road by W M Dean 1903

Figure 11 Architectural drawing of 7 Twickenham Road by W M Dean 1903

Figure 12 Architectural drawings of 1-3 Kingston Road from 1929

Figure 12 Architectural drawings of 1-3 Kingston Road from 1929

Figure 13 Teddington footbridge 1899

Figure 13 Teddington footbridge 1899

Figure 14 Lively river scene c1900

Figure 14 Lively river scene c1900

Figure 15 Teddington Weir 1938

Figure 15 Teddington Weir 1938

Figure 16 Lock scene showing lock house and toll house behind. Date unknown

Figure 16 Lock scene showing lock house and toll house behind. Date unknown

Figure 17 Udney House. Demolished c1900 for High Street development

Figure 17 Udney House. Demolished c1900 for High Street development

Figure 18 Udney Hall c1880. Demolished mid 20th century

Figure 18 Udney Hall c1880. Demolished mid 20th century

Figure 19 18th century cottages 163-167 High Street c1900

Figure 19 18th century cottages 163-167 High Street c1900

Figure 20 St Alban's church. Date unknown

Figure 20 St Alban's church. Date unknown

Figure 21 St Alban's church interior c1920

Figure 21 St Alban's church interior c1920

Figure 22 St Mary's parish church and graveyard 1955

Figure 22 St Mary's parish church and graveyard 1955

Figure 23 St Mary's parish church as viewed from High Street c1900

Figure 23 St Mary's parish church as viewed from High Street c1900

Figure 24 View of tramlines outside St Mary's parish church c1920

Figure 24 View of tramlines outside St Mary's parish church c1920

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5. Architectural Quality and Built Form

A description of the dominant architectural styles in the area, the types and periods of buildings, their status and essential characteristics, and their relationship to the topography, street pattern and skyline. Also important is their authenticity, distinctiveness and materiality.

There are a number of listed buildings in this conservation area.

5.1 Listed Buildings

A listed building is a building that has been placed on the Statutory List of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. Buildings on this list may not be demolished, extended or altered without Listed Building Consent.

Iron suspension bridge – Grade II

The pair of bridges at Teddington Lock were built to replace the former ferry crossing operating between Teddington on the south bank and Ham on the north bank of the River Thames.

This single span steel suspension footbridge was designed by George Pooley and built in 1888. It features two pairs of steel towers surmounted by delicate finials, and connected with steel suspension cables. It links the Teddington bank to Creweyte/ Swan Ait Island.

Figure 25 Iron suspension bridge

Figure 25 Iron suspension bridge

Steel girder bridge - Grade II

This single span steel footbridge of riveted sectional girder construction with cross ties is more modest than its neighbouring suspension bridge. It features partly rendered concrete piers whereas that on the south of the bridge incorporates a brick arch to allow pedestrian access beneath.

There are moulded stone coping stones to the south pier. It connects Creweyte/Swan Ait Island to the Ham bank.

Figure 26 Steel girder bridge

Figure 26 Steel girder bridge

Boathouse (27 Ferry Road) – Grade II

Adjacent to Teddington Lock, the boatyard in Ferry Road dates from the mid-19th century, with a map showing it in 1850.

The boathouse was probably built in 1862 (the date is inscribed on several bricks on the south gable wall).

It was extended by the mid-1890s, with the addition of a lean-to on the north-west side, and altered again in the 1970s, when an upper floor was added to the riverside gable and the interior of the boathouse was opened up to house larger boats. It is possible that the upper floor was added in the later C19.

James Messenger, the first known tenant and a champion sculler, established a flourishing business at the yard; in 1862 he was appointed Queen’s Bargemaster, a post he held until 1890. During the first World War the yard supplied vessels for the shipbuilders Thornycrofts, whose yard was based at Platts Eyot further upstream.

The main building is red brick at ground floor level with a cogged eaves line lying between this and the weatherboarded upper storey with a slate roof. There are two shallow brick arches over the doorways, with recessed brickwork under the arches, creating the appearance of brick pilasters on either side of and between the arches. The lean-to extension to the south is also of brick construction but has been painted cream. This lean-to is quite plain but features a series of semi-circular windows. Otherwise, all of the windows to the building are plain painted timber casements.

Figure 27 Boathouse at termination of Ferry Road

Figure 27 Boathouse at termination of Ferry Road

St Mary's Church – Grade II*

Now called St Mary and St Alban, St Mary's parish church is a Grade II listed brick-built church dating from the 16th century with 18th century chancel and tower.

The south aisle features red Tudor brick with dark vitrified headers forming diaper pattern detailing. There are stone dressings to the 18th century nave. This church features a wide variety of materials; the north aisle and tower are made of brown brick with the chancel made of yellow brick.

The 18th century castellated west tower was built in 3 stages, with round arches. The north aisle also features 3 round arched windows. There is a three-light perpendicular window to east end. The church includes monuments to Peg Woffington, Henry Hitcroft and John Walters - founder of The Times.

The church is set within a modest church yard which includes a graveyard with an abundance of wildflowers and mature trees.

Figure 28 View of St Mary's with its tower

Figure 28 View of St Mary's with its tower

Figure 29 View of St Mary's from the graveyard

Figure 29 View of St Mary's from the graveyard

St Alban's Church – Grade II*

Built in1886, this large neo-Gothic stone church with green copper roof was designed by William Nevin in the Early English style. The west end is incomplete with no tower. The flying buttresses to the nave are also incomplete.

Figure 30 View of St Alban's (currently Landmark Arts Centre)

Figure 30 View of St Alban's (currently Landmark Arts Centre)

Figure 31 Detailed view of St Alban's

Figure 31 Detailed view of St Alban's

163-167 High Street – Grade II

Early 18th century group of two storey plus attic terraced cottages. These cottages are quite wide, each having four windows at first floor level and two dormers. The roof is covered with traditional clay tiles and the dormers are flat roofed with lead cheeks. Brick built with first floor band course. No 165 known as 'Peg Woffington Cottage' with plaque bearing date 1759. Timber framed casement windows of varying designs – some with leaded lights, some with timber glazing bars, all with segmental heads to ground floor. The cottages have very shallow front gardens with boundary hedges, with the westernmost cottage having a low brick wall with railings instead.

Figure 32 163-167 High Street

Figure 32 163-167 High Street

Figure 33 View of the shallow front gardens

Figure 33 View of the shallow front gardens

Figure 34 Peg Woffington cottage

Figure 34 Peg Woffington cottage

Oak Cottage, 159 High Street – Grade II

This modest 18th century two storey, timber framed rendered cottage features a small section of weatherboarding on its gable end. Its steeply pitched roof is formed of traditional clay tiles and has a central brick chimneystack.

The first-floor timber sash windows break through the eaves slightly. The lower windows are canted bays with timber casements.

Oak Cottage lies behind a mature hedge while the adjoining 157 High Street, has an unpainted picket fence.

Figure 35 157-159 High Street

Figure 35 157-159 High Street

5.2 Ferry Road

Ferry Road, which extends from the riverside, retains its historic village character by virtue of its informal mix of building ages, uses and architectural styles. It serves as the gateway to the High Street and River Thames and provides views of the suspension bridge and lock beyond.

The eastern end of the road comprises a mix of modest two storey cottages, more substantial late Victorian four storey semi-detached houses, and the distinctive timber clad boathouse at its terminus.

3-13 Ferry Road is a group of three pairs of semi-detached four storey houses. They are built of mixed stock brick with red brick banding. Their height and formality are in contrast to the modest cottages and boat building premises elsewhere on Ferry Road.

The front doors have pointed brick arches and there are double height canted bays at ground and first floor levels. The westernmost pair (3-5) have had their original front doors and associated arches replaced by simple windows, relocating the entrances to the side. This disrupts the consistency of the group. The brick arches of the central pair (5-7) have been painted. All three pairs of houses have their boundary walls intact.

Figure 36 157-159 High Street

Figure 36 157-159 High Street

Figure 37 7-9 Ferry Road

Figure 37 7-9 Ferry Road

Figure 38 13 Ferry Road with unpainted brick arch intact

Figure 38 13 Ferry Road with unpainted brick arch intact

Figure 39 3-5 Ferry Road showing uPVC windows at number 3. These are poor replacements of the original sashes.

Figure 39 3-5 Ferry Road showing uPVC windows at number 3. These are poor replacements of the original sashes.

Figure 40 brick front boundary walls intact

Figure 40 brick front boundary walls intact

Figure 41 15-17 Ferry Road

Figure 41 15-17 Ferry Road

Immediately to their right is a lower pair of two storey semi-detached houses, again of stock brick with red dressings.

They have rounded red brick arches over the porches. The house on the right has been painted which detracts visually in terms of the matched pair.

The front gardens of these houses along with the front boundaries have been lost to car parking. This loss of the front boundary separating the road from the building compromises the setting of the building and in turn its character. The loss of planting also has a detrimental effect on the character of the building and overall street scene. Loss of greenery is also damaging from an environmental point of view.

There was originally a third house in this group but this has been demolished to make way for the entrance to Quay West Court.

The Tide End Cottage, now a public house, is a modest building with painted render, timber sash windows, a plain clay tiled roof and canted bays at ground floor.

Adjoining Tide End Cottage to the east is a terrace of three modest cottages. Unfortunately, all three front doors have been replaced with the same unsympathetic modern door. They have also all been painted, covering the brickwork. The original timber sash windows, however, remain.

Figure 42 Tide End Cottage Public House

Figure 42 Tide End Cottage Public House

Figure 43 10-14 Ferry Road

Figure 43 10-14 Ferry Road

These cottages sit opposite the gated entrance to Quay West Court, a dark brown brick four storey development. This probably dates from the late 1970s or early 1980s. The graduated arrangement of the floors facing the river is key to the unobtrusive nature of this development, particularly in terms of its effect on the river scene. It is also set back from the river edge behind garden and lawn. This helps to retain the green landscape character when seen from the river.

Figure 44 Quay West Court as viewed from Ferry Road

Figure 44 Quay West Court as viewed from Ferry Road

Figure 45 Quay West Court as viewed from the river. Note significant green space between it and the river edge.

Figure 45 Quay West Court as viewed from the river. Note significant green space between it and the river edge.

5.3 Broom Road

At the entrance to Broom Road is a group of converted outbuildings facing directly onto the road; they are associated with one of the two storey houses on Ferry Road directly north. They provide visual interest by means of their multiple pitched roofs.

Figure 46 1A Ferry Road

Figure 46 1A Ferry Road

The Anglers hotel and pub fronts onto Broom Road. The two-storey 18th century building has a parapeted roof, white painted render finish and timber sash windows. This building is quite simple and elegant. The rear elevation, as seen from Teddington Footbridge, is more rustic in character with red/brown brick and black sash windows of more square proportions.

Figure 47 Anglers Hotel and Pub showing car park

Figure 47 Anglers Hotel and Pub showing car park

Figure 48 Anglers Hotel and Pub

Figure 48 Anglers Hotel and Pub

2016 saw the demolition of Teddington Studios and its replacement with residential apartments. Though this is just outside the conservation area, this redevelopment does impact on the view from the river and Ham bank. The Teddington Riverside development replaced the large-scale buildings of Teddington Studios. Because of the presence of riverside trees, views are to some extent filtered and the development appears more integrated with its setting than riverside apartment blocks to the north side of the footbridge.

Numbers 4-10 Broom Road are a group of four houses characterised by their stone window dressings. All four houses have been built to a design possibly inspired by the works of C F A Voysey.

The northernmost building, number 4, is a large, detached house with its buff stone window surrounds and mullions intact.

6 Broom Road, in contrast, has been damaged by the painting of the stone window surrounds.

8-10 Broom Road is a pair of semi-detached houses, built in the same style but with dark brick window surrounds.

Figure 49 4 Broom Road

Figure 49 4 Broom Road

Figure 50 6 Broom Road

Figure 50 6 Broom Road

Figure 51 8-10 Broom Road

Figure 51 8-10 Broom Road

5.4 Kingston Road

At the junction between Ferry Road and Kingston Road are a series of five early 20th century detached houses (numbers 1-9).

These have a painted roughcast render finish, with hipped roofs and buff stone window dressings.

There is an original drawing of this pair from 1903. See Figure 12.

They are similar in style to those at Broom Road. Considering they back on to one another it is likely they were built at the same time.

The Kingston Road examples have a strong collective character in that there are a larger number, are consistent in detail and are in better original condition. They have generous front gardens and closed boarded fences as front boundaries.

There is an Article 4 Direction (pdf, 872 KB) dating from 1996 covering these houses on Broom Road, Kingston Road and Twickenham Road.

Figure 52 3 Kingston Road

Figure 52 3 Kingston Road

Figure 53 Boundary fencing outside 5 Kingston Road

Figure 53 Boundary fencing outside 5 Kingston Road

The Old Vicarage on Kingston Road, adjoining St Alban's church, is a large red brick two storey plus attic detached house.

It features an off-centre projecting front gable, gabled dormers and an arched porch, with Gothic detailing which may have been an intentional reflection of its use and connection with the neo-Gothic St Alban's.

Figure 54 2 Kingston Road, The Old Vicarage

Figure 54 2 Kingston Road, The Old Vicarage

5.5 Twickenham Road

7-17 Twickenham Road is a distinctive early 20th century group of large houses consisting of two semi-detached pairs and two detached houses. An original drawing (see Figure 11) for 7 Twickenham Road shows a W M Dean as the architect.

They feature a roughcast render finish, buff stone window dressings and plain clay tiled hipped roofs. They are similar in character to contemporary groups on Broom and Kingston Roads. The northernmost pairs of semi-detached houses retain their unpainted roughcast render finish, though they are of different colours. It is unclear which is the original finish.

The houses sit behind generous front gardens with brick boundary walls and original design timber gates.

All houses in this group are in an excellent state of original repair, retaining their leaded light windows and front doors and make a positive contribution to the conservation area.

Figure 55 9 Twickenham Road

Figure 55 9 Twickenham Road

Figure 56 17 Twickenham Road

Figure 56 17 Twickenham Road

Perhaps the most distinctive group of buildings on the riverside, when viewed from the Ham bank, is the series of 1990’s apartment blocks consisting of Regatta House, Fairmile House and Admiral House, all fronting Twickenham Road and overlooking the Thames behind.

They were built on former boatyards which were distinctive features of the riverine landscape until the late 20th century.

The blocks range from 5 to 7 storeys in height and are painted a combination of terracotta and magnolia with white plain glazed windows and metal balconies.

These flats are in stark contrast with other parts of the area in terms of their size, massing and design. However they have well landscaped settings and are well set back from the road.

Figure 57 Fairmile House

Figure 57 Fairmile House

Figure 58 View of Fairmile, Regatta and Admiral House from the river

Figure 58 View of Fairmile, Regatta and Admiral House from the river

Figure 59 Balconies of Fairmile House

Figure 59 Balconies of Fairmile House

Figure 60 Well landscaped Admiral House

Figure 60 Well landscaped Admiral House

Opposite these, and in direct contrast, is a terrace of Victorian villas at 37-49 Twickenham Road. The houses are built over four storeys including a basement and attic level with original gabled dormers. They are built of mixed stock brick and the timber sash windows have decorative white painted window surrounds. Recessed porches lie behind painted arched doorways

Figure 61 37-49 Twickenham Road

Figure 61 37-49 Twickenham Road

The Wharf building, a surviving reminder of the former boatyard, is built of stock brick with sash windows. It is currently a restaurant and can be accessed between Fairmile House and Admiral House. It is a Building of Townscape Merit. It is more visible from the river than from the road.

Figure 62 The Wharf

Figure 62 The Wharf

Figure 63 Northern elevation of the Wharf building showing a glazed terrace

Figure 63 Northern elevation of the Wharf building showing a glazed terrace

Braemar House and 4-6 Manor Road are large modern buildings with no particular architectural merit. They do however benefit from being well set back from the road, obscured by planting and in well landscaped settings.

5.6 Eastern end of Ferry Road

The two churches and their verdant landscapes form both the bridge and the divide between the character areas. Ferry Road merges into the High Street as it turns the gentle corner at Peg Woffington’s Cottage, obscuring the High Street from view as you approach from Ferry Road.

5.7 High Street

The attractive listed group of cottages, including Peg Woffington Cottage mark the gateway to the High Street.

These modest two storey cottages dating from the 18th century, along with nearby Oak Cottage, are the earliest surviving domestic buildings in the conservation area.

These cottages, along with parish church of St Mary, are evocative of the original village character of Teddington.

Further to the west, the High Street has a more urban character consisting of later Victorian and Edwardian buildings enclosing the street, which blends into the adjoining conservation area of High Street, Teddington (37).

Opposite the cottages is an old garage building which has been converted to a Sainsburys Local. Its Art Deco design adds visual interest to the High Street

Figure 64 163-167 High Street

Figure 64 163-167 High Street

Figure 65 196 High Street, currently Sainsburys Local

Figure 65 196 High Street, currently Sainsburys Local

180 High Street is a large early 21st century building on the south side of the High Street. Its four-storey height means it towers over the neighbouring converted garage building. Despite its size, it blends in relatively well due to its overall design and use of sympathetic materials. It is built of mixed stock brick and has sash windows and a clay tiled roof.

Figure 66 180 High Street

Figure 66 180 High Street

141-155 High Street is a group of four semi-detached pairs of villa style stock brick houses. They comprise four storeys including basement and attic floors. The westernmost two pairs match, with three out of four of the houses having painted brick arches; this detracts from their visual appearance. The third pair is of similar proportions but the houses have highly decorated door and window surrounds as opposed to plain brick arches.

Figure 67 141-155 High Street

Figure 67 141-155 High Street

Figure 68 153-155 High Street

Figure 68 153-155 High Street

The final pair is similar to the third in detail in terms of its door surrounds, but with more rounded window heads and double height canted bays at ground and first floor levels. All of the villas have substantial front gardens, many of which have been lost to car parking; this detracts from their character and that of the High Street.​

Guidance on the use of front gardens for car parking can be found in the Transport SPD. We will normally resist replacement of gardens with hard standings for car parking, where planning consent is required. However, in the limited cases where it would be acceptable (for example, where the removal of kerbside parking would enable the widening of a pavement, the provision of a cycle lane or relieve traffic congestion) it is very important that off street parking, should be designed to cause minimum intrusion and harm.

Opposite, there is a group of buildings incorporating shops and restaurants at ground floor level. 174-176 High Street represents a two-storey red brick building dated 1910 with a pedimented parapeted roof. This building is not in particularly good condition and some of the timber windows have been replaced unsympathetically with uPVC.

Figure 69 174-176 High Street

Figure 69 174-176 High Street

To the west 170-172 is a modern four storey building built of red brick with concrete banding with a restaurant at ground floor level. This is slightly out of scale with its surroundings.

Figure 70 170-172 High Street

Figure 70 170-172 High Street

Figure 71 Ground floor elevation of 170-172 High Street

Figure 71 Ground floor elevation of 170-172 High Street

Further west 164-168 is a three-storey red brick Edwardian parade of shops featuring first floor canted bays, white painted stone banding, and rather squat Dutch gables with mansard roofs behind. Some shops in this parade retain their original timber shop fronts with decorative corbels capped with triangular pediments, decorative glazing and patterned tiled recessed entrances.

Figure 71 Ground floor elevation of 170-172 High Street

Figure 71 Ground floor elevation of 170-172 High Street

Figure 73 166 High Street

Figure 73 166 High Street

5.8 Langham Road

Langham Road extends south from the High Street and gives access to Udney Hall Gardens.

St Mary's Parish Hall is a late 19th century red brick building with buff stone window dressings and a steeply pitched roof. It was refurbished in the late 20th century and is well used by the local community.

Figure 74 St Mary's Parish Hall

Figure 74 St Mary's Parish Hall

5.9 Riverside

The Porter and Bryce Building at the terminus of Ferry Road was used as the Royal Boathouse in the late 19th century, illustrating Teddington's status on the River Thames on the route between Hampton Court and Kew. Boat building became an established industry in Teddington and is now an important part of the area's character.

Along the riverside there is still a busy collection of boathouses, moored boats, wharfage and slipways which create a rich panorama of riverside activity and make this a centre of navigation and tourism on the Thames.

Figure 75 River scene with moored boats

Figure 75 River scene with moored boats

However, the more recent introduction of large apartment blocks fronting the River Thames has changed some of the character from water-borne commercial activities to a denser residential living environment.

Figure 76 View of the Lock

Figure 76 View of the Lock

5.10 Lock and Weir

There is a distinct contrast between the noise and action of the weir and the peaceful neatness of the well-tended lock area.

Teddington Lock, the weir and the suspension footbridge between the Middlesex and Surrey banks are key landmark features. The bridges provide wide views up and down stream.

Figure 77 View of the weir

Figure 77 View of the weir

The lock itself is a robust concrete structure in the same position as the stone lock of 1858, which was built at the same time as the skiff lock.

In 2007 significant refurbishment works were undertaken, including the replacement of various walls with new concrete walls, and replacing the wooden gates with steel gates.

Figure 78 Detailed view of the Lock

Figure 78 Detailed view of the Lock

Figure 79 Concrete walls of Lock structure

Figure 79 Concrete walls of Lock structure

The lock structure itself seems to be in good condition.

The abundance of railings and safety information signage, although essential, detracts visually from the lock scene.

Figure 80 Health and Safety signage

Figure 80 Health and Safety signage

The early 20th century toll house is brick built with half-timbered gables. This modest single storey building replaced an earlier toll house on the Ham bank which remains.

Figure 81 Toll House

Figure 81 Toll House

The early 20th century toll house is brick built with half-timbered gables. This modest single storey building replaced an earlier toll house on the Ham bank which remains.

The river and Ham bank form a secluded, semi-rural environment framed by dense tree cover on the islands

The Thames Path, which stretches 213 miles from the Cotswolds to the Thames Barrier, follows the Ham bank and attracts visitors to Teddington from both the Kingston and Richmond directions.

5.11 Ham Bank

The Ham side of the bank has remained rural in nature, being inaccessible except on foot.

Figure 82 View of the Ham bank with the old Toll House in the background

Figure 82 View of the Ham bank with the old Toll House in the background

Figure 83 Path leading to Ham, through the Ham Lands Nature Reserve

Figure 83 Path leading to Ham, through the Ham Lands Nature Reserve

In contrast to the Middlesex bank, the Surrey bank has a rural character providing a well treed backdrop to the lock and its neat cottages. The towpath on this bank forms part of the Thames Path and is well used by walkers and cyclists.

The19th century two storey lock house stands proudly on the Ham bank. Along with the old Toll House below they are the only visible buildings in this part of the conservation area.

It has a central projecting gable and is built of red brick and roughcast render.

It has a shallow jettied first floor with timber sprocketed detailing beneath and an impressive open timber porch,

Hidden behind the mature hedging lies the old Toll House which has similar detailing to the nearby lock house, so may be of the same age.

It features painted roughcast render walling and a plain clay tiled roof. Its original timber windows have regrettably been replaced with uPVC versions.

Figure 84 Lock House

Figure 84 Lock House

Figure 85 Obscured view of the old Toll House

Figure 85 Obscured view of the old Toll House

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6. Architectural Details

Figure 86 Sprocketed eaves of the Lock House

Figure 86 Sprocketed eaves of the Lock House

Figure 87 Brick arch at 13 Ferry Road

Figure 87 Brick arch at 13 Ferry Road

Figure 88 Cogged eaves at the boathouse on Ferry Road

Figure 88 Cogged eaves at the boathouse on Ferry Road

Figure 89 Stone door surround at St Alban's church

Figure 89 Stone door surround at St Alban's church

Figure 90 Cast iron downpipe at St Alban's Church

Figure 90 Cast iron downpipe at St Alban's Church

Figure 91 Leaded light windows in buff stone window surrounds at 11 Twickenham Road

Figure 91 Leaded light windows in buff stone window surrounds at 11 Twickenham Road

Figure 92 Timber casement window with simple rounded brick arch at 163 High Street

Figure 92 Timber casement window with simple rounded brick arch at 163 High Street

Figure 93 Streetlight column on Ferry Road

Figure 93 Streetlight column on Ferry Road

Figure 94 Peg Woffington's Cottage plaque at 167 High Street

Figure 94 Peg Woffington's Cottage plaque at 167 High Street

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7. Open Space, Parks, Gardens and Trees

An overview of private and public spaces; front gardens, trees, hedges, street planting, historic parks and gardens, civic spaces and their contribution to the character and experience of an area.

7.1 Udney Hall Gardens

This pleasant area of green space, immediately south of St Alban's Church lies on the site previously occupied by Udney Hall, formerly Teddington Place. This was the former seat of magnate Sir Charles Dunscombe, one of the richest men of his day and Lord Mayor of London in 1709. The 18th century house was demolished in 1946.

The gardens feature large areas of lawn and several mature trees. There are benches and bins for public use. The gardens are included on the London Gardens Trust Inventory.

Figure 95 Mature trees in Udney Hall Gardens

Figure 95 Mature trees in Udney Hall Gardens

Figure 96 View of St Alban's church in Udney Hall Gardens

Figure 96 View of St Alban's church in Udney Hall Gardens

7.2 Manor Road Recreation Ground

Manor Road Recreation Ground is an important area of public space which provides wide views of the lock from Twickenham Road which helps to tie this area with the riverside. It is listed in the London Gardens Trust Inventory.

This quiet verdant space with wide open lawn and mature trees has a pleasant aspect, overlooking the lock. There is an old boat house to the north end of the grounds. Though this is in private ownership, it ads to the overall enjoyment of the grounds. There is also a Metropolitan Drinking Fountain and Cattle Trough Association drinking fountain. This is in the 1929 design common across many parks and schools. Sadly it is no longer functional.

Figure 97 Expansive lawn at Manor Road Recreational Ground

Figure 97 Expansive lawn at Manor Road Recreational Ground

Figure 98 Tarmacadam path in Manor Road Recreational Ground

Figure 98 Tarmacadam path in Manor Road Recreational Ground

Figure 99 Drinking fountain

Figure 99 Drinking fountain

Figure 100 Old boathouse in Manor Road Recreational Ground

Figure 100 Old boathouse in Manor Road Recreational Ground

Figure 101 View of Lock with the suspension bridge in the distance

Figure 101 View of Lock with the suspension bridge in the distance

There is a small triangular section of land across from St Mary’s church on the corner of Ferry Road and Twickenham Road. It has two benches and several trees of varying degrees of maturity.

Figure 102 Section of land on corner of High Street and Twickenham Road, opposite St Mary's parish church

Figure 102 Section of land on corner of High Street and Twickenham Road, opposite St Mary's parish church

St Alban's (Landmark Arts Centre) has ample grounds with mature trees. A large proportion of the grounds are now car parking for the Arts centre. There is a mixture of lawn, planting and bark mulch. There are no formal benches but there are various tree stumps on which to sit.

St Mary's, in its modest plot is mostly occupied by graves and tombs of considerable age. It also boasts many mature trees and wildflowers, the trees being protected by a Tree Preservation Order. Though owned by the Diocese, as this is a closed churchyard under the Burial Act 1853, the Council is responsible for maintaining the church yard under the Local Government Act 1972. In order to protect and enhance habitats, they have to be actively managed.

Figure 103 Grounds of St Albans church / Landmark Arts centre with tree stumps serving as seats

Figure 103 Grounds of St Albans church / Landmark Arts centre with tree stumps serving as seats

Figure 104 Graveyard of St Mary's parish church

Figure 104 Graveyard of St Mary's parish church

The lock itself has a notable amount of lawn and contributes to the overall green character of the riverside.

Across the river, the Ham bank is heavily wooded, providing lush green views. Ham Lands is a 72-hectare Local Nature Reserve and Site of Metropolitan Importance for Nature Conservation with a mixture of habitats ranging from woodland, grassland to wetland. Noted for its invertebrates and interesting grassland plant diversity.

Figure 105 Grass on the Lock and banks of the Lock

Figure 105 Grass on the Lock and banks of the Lock

7.3 Street trees

There are very few street trees in this conservation area.

There are just three on the high street, one outside St Mary’s church, one outside the boathouse on Ferry Road and several beside the suspension bridge.

There are three on Manor Road in front of Fairmile House and Regatta House.

7.4 Public realm and street furniture

Bins

There are very few bins in this conservation area. Only five were noted, all of differing designs. There is one outside Sainsburys on the High Street, one outside Udney Hall Gardens on Langham Road, one beside the bus stop on Ferry Road, one beside the bus stop on Kingston Road, and one on the corner opposite St Mary's church.

Bollards

Generally, in Teddington Lock Conservation Area there are wooden bollards with tapered tops. This distinct difference from the usual metal bollards further enforces the more rural nature of this conservation area.

Figure 106 Example of wooden bollard

Figure 106 Example of wooden bollard

Benches

There are two wooden benches in the small area of green space across from St Mary's church. There are also several wooden benches in Udney Hall Gardens.

Figure 107 Bench across from St Mary's church

Figure 107 Bench across from St Mary's church

Streetlights

Generally, the streetlights in this area are not of a traditional style.

The streetlights on the High Street, Manor Road, Kingston Road and along the western end of Ferry Road are very tall and modern. They are not consistent in colour, being a mixture of green and unpainted stainless steel. They angle the light directly downwards.

There are different streetlights on the residential streets such as Ferry Road, Twickenham Road and Langham Road. These are less tall and have less of a projecting lamp but still direct the light downwards. These are not particularly attractive and look quite industrial.

Figure 108 Streetlight on the High Street

Figure 108 Streetlight on the High Street

Cycle stands

There are two on the high street, next to one another both in stainless steel. While the finish is clearly of high quality, they do not match the predominant dark green colour palette of the street furniture in the area.

Figure 109 Cycle stand on the High Street

Figure 109 Cycle stand on the High Street

Post boxes

There is a George V pillar box post box on the High Street and a Victorian post box in the wall at the junction of Twickenham and Ferry Roads.

Figure 110 George V post box on the High Street

Figure 110 George V post box on the High Street

Figure 111 Victorian post box

Figure 111 Victorian post box

Paving quality and material

The paving in this conservation area is not of particularly good quality and is generally paved with plain high load concrete slabs, many of which are cracked.

There are also sporadic smaller sections of tarmacadam and poured concrete.

The pavements are generally edged in granite kerbs.

Figure 112 High load concrete slap pavement edged in granite kerbs

Figure 112 High load concrete slap pavement edged in granite kerbs

Figure 113 Example of cracked concrete slabs

Figure 113 Example of cracked concrete slabs

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8. Management Plan

This Management Plan outlines how we intend to preserve and enhance the character and appearance of the conservation area in future. We have a duty to formulate and publish these proposals under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990.

8.1 Problems and pressures

  • Development pressure which may harm the balance of the river and landscape-dominated setting, and the obstruction or spoiling of views, skylines and landmarks
  • Loss of traditional architectural features and materials due to unsympathetic alterations and extensions
  • Loss of boundary walls and garden space in residential areas for hard standings and front lightwells.
  • Lack of coordination and poor quality of street furniture and surfacing
  • Use of poor-quality products in building works such as UPVC, roofing felt and GRP (Glass fibre reinforced polymers) products

8.2 Opportunities for enhancement

  • Improvement and protection of river and landscape setting
  • Preservation, enhancement and reinstatement of architectural quality and unity that is preferably based upon historic evidence
  • Seek the reinstallation of boundary treatment and front garden planting alongside planning applications for refurbishment or development
  • Coordination of colour and design and improvement in quality of street furniture
  • Seek to locate lightwells to the side or rear of properties and to ensure that they are of modest proportions
  • Seek to encourage good quality and proportionate design and quality materials that are sympathetic to the period and style of the building
  • Preservation of visual gaps between properties
  • Plant more street trees

8.3 Streetscene

  • Instate better quality, traditional paving slabs and kerbs
  • Retain granite kerbs and drainage channels
  • Lamp posts, traffic related columns, bollards and cycle stands to be green-black finish (RAL 6012)
  • All bollards, benches to remain in timber
  • There are opportunities to regularise and improve parking signage
  • More street trees to be planted
  • Footway tree surrounds to be permeable bonded gravel
  • The approach to the footbridge from Ferry Road and riverside seating area could benefit from an overall enhancement scheme including paving, seating area and street furniture improvement
  • Paving and street furniture changes should accord with the guidance in the Public Space Design Guide

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References

Archive photographs: Richmond Local Studies Library 

Historic Maps: National Library of Scotland National Library of Scotland - Map Images

Listed building information: Historic England

Updated: 28 June 2022

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