Temporary traffic management order procedure

Utility companies, developers, contractors or any other body requiring a temporary traffic management order must follow this procedure.

Orders are made under section 14(1) of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984. In exceptional circumstances we may issue a notice under section 14(2) if there is an urgent need for the restriction to come into force without delay.

What can orders be made for?

Orders or notices may be made/issued for matters such as:

  • Parking restrictions
  • Road closure
  • Other traffic management measures such as one-way working, banned turns etc
  • Towpath /Footpath closure.

How long do orders last for?

Restrictions introduced by temporary orders under s14(1) may remain in force for up to 18 months. Those introduced by a notice under s14(2) may vary between 5 days and 21 days depending on the reason for the works being carried out. We will use our discretion as to how long any particular order shall remain in force according to the circumstances.

How do I apply?

Normally the application must be made at least eight weeks before the restriction needs to come into force.

The applicant must submit the following:

  • Temporary traffic management order application form
  • A traffic management plan, in accordance with Chapter eight of the Traffic Signs Manual.
  • A method statement of the works to take place
  • A risk assessment of the works to take place
  • A draft letter to residents
  • Temporary traffic signals notification form

In exceptional circumstances, the contractor should contact the Metropolitan Police. If the work requires more than a day for its completion, the contractor must inform the Council. The Council will issue a notice under Section 14(2) and comply with all statutory requirements.

Forms and templates can be found at the bottom of the page.

What does an order cost?

Costs for temporary orders and notices are specified us in an annual schedule of fees and charges. Charges are effective from 1 April.

Costs for 2017-18
Section Cost
Section 14(1) Order £1,619
Section 14(2) Notice £1,203
Traffic management only (activity without excavation) licence £250

Please note that only one of these fees is payable, depending on whether the restriction is authorised by order (the normal case) or by notice (exceptional cases). These fees are not subject to VAT.

The preferred method of payment is by cheque (payable to 'London Borough of Richmond upon Thames') with the application. Alternatively, the applicant may provide a purchase order and we will invoice.

What happens next?

We will comply with statutory requirements (giving public notice, display of street notices and statutory notification). Together with the applicant we must carry out local publicity. Our agreement is subject to other works programmed in the borough.

In most cases, a site meeting will be necessary between a Council officer and the applicant’s works manager or representative. If necessary, and following the meeting the applicant should submit revised versions of any of the above documents.

What else is the applicant responsible for?

The applicant will also be responsible for the following items upon receiving agreement from us:

For road closure

  • Advance warning signs
  • Road closure signs
  • Diversion signs

For footway/pavement closure

  • Footway closure signs
  • Pedestrian diversion signs

For towpath/footpath closure

  • Advance warning signs
  • Footpath closure signs
  • Pedestrian diversion signs

For parking restrictions

  • No parking signs
  • No parking cones
  • Towing and relocating vehicles

The Council is able to supply and fix traffic signs at additional cost. If vehicles are parked in contravention of the temporary orders or notices, they may only be removed or relocated by the Council’s specialist contractor, but at the expense of the applicant. Information is available on request. The Council has specific no-waiting sign format. This specified sign must be used in case of parking restrictions.

Forms and templates

Updated: 7 April 2017