Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs)

This web page explains what Energy Performance Certificates are, and what the Building Regulations require.

What is an Energy Performance Certificate?

An Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) is broadly similar to the labels provided with domestic appliances such as refrigerators and washing machines.

If works are carried out to create a dwelling or dwellings, either by means of new build or by alteration/conversion (for example, subdivision of an existing building into flats or conversion of, for example a barn) of an existing building, the builder or person responsible for the construction must obtain an Energy Performance Certificate and provide it to the owner. This is a duty under Building Regulations. This will also apply if a building is converted into fewer or more units and there are changes to the heating, hot water provision or air conditioning/ventilation services.

Some commercial buildings will require an Energy Performance Certificate on construction or such conversion from this date. More information on Energy Performance Certificates for the construction of a home and the timetable for phasing in EPC measures is available on the Communities and Local Government (CLG) website.

The basic requirements

All homes physically completed on or after 6 April 2008 will need to have an Energy Performance Certificate provided on construction. The term "on construction" means the point in time when the building is physically complete to the extent that the relevant requirements of Schedule 1 of the Building Regulations have been satisfied.

It is the responsibility of the builder to provide an Energy Performance Certificate when a home is constructed and physically completed from 6 April 2008. This will also apply if a building is converted into fewer or more units and changes are made to the heating, hot water provision or air conditioning/ventilation services.

When the home is physically complete, the builder must obtain an Energy Performance Certificate for the home, provide the Energy Performance Certificate to the new owner of the home, and notify the Building Control body that this has been done. This must be done no later than the time specified by the building regulations which is within 5 days of completion or within in accordance with regulation 20B if a pressure test is required. It is mandatory that a certificate must be issued by a person accredited to produce certificates for that category of building.

Once the Building Control body is satisfied that the Energy Performance Certificate has been properly produced and provided to the relevant party, they are able to issue a final completion certificate.

From 6 April 2008, a Building Control Final Completion Certificate for a home cannot be issued by a Building Control body unless they are satisfied that an Energy Performance Certificate has been provided.

To read more about EPCs, download the Energy Performance Certificates flyer produced by LABC.

Updated: 20 November 2013